Category: Beaches

Category: Beaches

Cala Llombards

Cala Llombards is a beautiful petite cove defined by rough rock walls and framed with pine trees. With its sandy beach, turquoise waters and red cliffs it truly is a picture-postcard setting.

The secluded cove beach is located in the southeast of the island close to the small village of Es Llombards and around 10km from the handsome inland town of Santyani.

Just 55m long but nearly 150m deep, Cala Llombards is not a big beach but it is truly beautiful. It is surrounded by steep cliffs and has rocky areas, pine trees and bushes plus soft white sand and really crystal clear water; which is ideal for snorkelling.

With the exception of those who live or rent in the surrounding area, the beach is not well-known and therefore it escapes the tourist crowds.

It is a safe beach for kids because there are very few waves and is popular with locals and tourists of all ages. There is a lifeguard present during the summer months.

Facilities include lounge chairs and parasols plus showers and toilets; however there are no water activities for hire.

You’ll find just one beach bar at Cala Llombards; which serves drinks and snacks.

When you’ve packed up from the beach, we recommend a trip to the local town of Santyani, its a handsome town in south east Mallorca. Both serene and historic, it is located between Parc Natural de Mondragó and Ses Salines and the honey-coloured architecture, fine choice of bars, boutique shops, art galleries & restaurants are a massive draw to tourists.

Particularly favoured by German tourists, this pretty, rural, authentically Mallorcan town is blessed with beautiful natural surroundings.

With a slow pace of life, quaint cobbled streets and majestic church, Santyani has a special quality. Sit down on one of the many terraces on the main square (Plaça Major) in front of the church and watch the world go by.

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Sa Calobra Beach

Sa Calobra beach is a well-known remote cove on the west coast of Mallorca situated a short walk away from the incredible rocky river gorge, Es Torrent de Pareis.

It is a small and undeniably attractive white-pebble cove with blue-green crystal clear water and is one of the most famous spots on the island.

There are two beaches in the cove, the first one is small and stony and is not the beach that everyone comes to see, that can be found by taking the paved path on the right-hand-side; which takes you through a short and narrow tunnel.

If you are planning to stay at the beach for a while, you’ll need to bring along some things to make you comfortable as there are no facilities there including a lifeguard. You will find bars and restaurants back at Sa Calobra where you will also find public toilets and first aid.

The spot is indeed lovely and has served as an inspiration to artists past and present; however it has become a victim of it’s own beauty. There are just too many tourists there and it's a coach & car-fest during the summer crush.

The beach has a history dating back to the 18th century and it is even rumoured that the infamous pirate Red Beard docked in Sa Calobra.

Tourists flock to this location in their hundreds all year around to admire the jaw-dropping scenery and to enjoy the incredible journey there with its twisting roads and spectacular views.

With a 800m descent over 12km and the infamous 270 degree loop known as the ‘Knotted Tie’ and incredible mountain views of Mallorca’s highest mountain, Puig Major, the road to Sa Calobra is an adventure in its own right.

Es Torrent de Pareis was elevated to the category of Natural Monument in 2003 by the Government of the Balearic Islands.

Cala Marçal

The Blue Flag spacious beach Cala Marcal is located on the eastern coast of the island 1km south of the marina and village of Portocolom.

The 500 m beach lies within a beautiful well-protected bay with rocks on both sides, fine white sand and clear waters. It is very popular, particularly during the summer months when it can get quite crowded.

Cala Marcal is ideal for families. The soft sand slopes into the sea; which is shallow and deepens gradually providing lots of space for the kids to swim and play.

On the beach, you will find all of the facilities you could need such as sun lounges, parasols, showers and toilets and during the summer peak season, the beach is also supervised by a lifeguard. There is also one large beach bar serving a good assortment of drinks and snacks.

Cala Marcal is popular with snorkelers because of the rocks but mostly, this is a beach for families, it is very safe and around the beach you will find everything you could need including shops, bars & restaurants.

Taking the car to Cala Marcal is easy, parking is available in the streets just south of the beach.

The local village of Portocolom is a sleepy, attractive traditional fishing village located on the east coast and is claimed rather dubiously as the birthplace of Christopher Columbus, although there is little evidence to support this.

Resisting the usual tourist onslaught associated with picturesque coastal villages, Portocolom is a maritime town located on a beautiful deep natural harbour in a large horseshoe-shaped bay.

Lying 12km north of Cala d’Or and within the district of Felanitx, Portocolom has retained much of its traditional fishing village charm with fishing boats, sailing boats and the occasional luxury motor yacht anchored in the calm waters of the bay.

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Portals Nous (Oratori) Beach

Oratori is simply a great beach and the Editor’s favourite. You couldn’t wish for a better location, right next to glamorous Puerto Portals with its numerous bars, cafés & restaurants & home of probably the best beach bar on the island, Roxy’s Beach Bar.

Oratori is a Blue Flag beach located between Puerto Portals and the small community of Bendinat in the southwest of the island. The beach is very popular with the younger crowd due to its proximity to Portals and the associated foodie and nightlife scene. The beach is also popular with families because of the superb nearby amenities and facilities.

You’ve got 250m of golden sand, clear blue seas and even an island to swim to should you find the energy to do so. Facilities include sun loungers and parasols, showers and toilets and lifeguards.

There’s also water sports available; which includes paddle boats and kayaks that you can rent.

You’ll find an eclectic mix of nationalities at Oratori. The beach is particularly attractive to British and German expats and locals – which is a good indicator of how fantastic the beach is. It is also popular with yachties who moor their yachts at the marina and come ashore to sunbathe and eat in the many restaurants.

For foodies, Puerto Portals offers an excellent choice with varied menus and venues. You can enjoy breakfast, lunch or dinner on sunny terraces watching the expensive cars drive by or choose a Mediterranean lounge setting or a salon.

The easiest way to drive to the beach is via the MA-1 that runs from Palma all the way through to Andratx. Take the Costa d’en Blanes-Portals Nous exit and then follow signs to Portals Nous.

Finding a parking space can be hit or miss and you’re probably end up having to take a bit of a walk from your car to the beach. Public transport may be your best option.

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Cala Deià

Cala Deià is a small, picturesque shingle beach framed by the stunning Tramuntana mountains and located on the northwest coast of Mallorca. The rocky, rugged beach has very clear 6m deep waters and is only around 70m long.

The tiny cove beach is mostly made up of large rocks and small pebbles with glistening rock pools and great views. It has two restaurants; which both provide local cuisine such as tapas, paella and an assortment of fish.

Located just outside the beautiful village of Deià, the beach is very popular with locals and visitors and is a favourite destination for artists. It is not unusual to see the occasional celebrity on the beach.

Cala Deià is an ideal location for swimming, snorkelling and diving due to the crystal clear waters; however there are no equipment rental facilities on the beach so you will need to bring your own.

The beach is not considered to be family-friendly due to the rocky beach and lack of sand, it also has multiple jellyfish sightings during the summer months. The beach also has no umbrellas, lounge chairs, water sports activities or lifeguard and access to first aid is minimal. The beach does have toilets and showers.

Many visitors enjoy walking along the cliffs up to the former pirate tower with its terrific views.

You can get to the beach by car and if you arrive early enough, there is a small car park or you could park in the village and walk, it is around 3 km.

Deià is a small mountain-coastal village that has attracted artists, tourists and celebrities for many years. One of the prettiest villages in Mallorca, Deià is part of a landscape awarded World Heritage Site status. The writer Robert Graves famously lived in the village twice with many of his creative, artistic friends coming to visit and Deià quickly gained a reputation as an artist’s retreat.

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Paseo Marítimo

The Paseo Marítimo is the wide sea promenade connecting the area of Porto Pi with the Parc de la Mar in front of the Cathedral. It is very popular with walkers, joggers and cyclists.

Also known as Avinguda Gabriel Roca, this 4 km stretch of promenade is the most popular walk in the city. There is so much to see along the way such as the wonderful harbour with row after row of yachts, Palma Cathedral, Bellver Castle and the stunning Mediterranean sea framed by pink sunrises or golden sunsets.

The recommended starting point for a walk along Paseo Maritimo is Porto Pi.  You’ll pass a number of attractions such as Tito’s; which is the hottest club in town (some would say, on the island) and Palma’s Auditorium; where you can watch shows and concerts and towards the end of your walk you’ll pass the 16th century wall around Es Baluard Museum. The final part of the 4km walk includes the Royal Palace of La Almudaina and the magnificent ‘La Seu’.

Forty plus years ago, the sea came right up to the walls of the Cathedral until the sea was pushed back in the 1970’s due to construction. City planners created an artificial lake called Parc de la Mar at the foot of La Seu; which today provides a great area for concerts and fairs plus a superb photograph opportunity.

Just beyond the cathedral at Ca’n Pere Antoni, is Palma City Beach. It is a golden, sandy beach that is very popular with the locals and visitors who are staying in Palma and fancy a quick dip in the sea.

From Palma City Beach, the wide pedestrian promenade joins the popular resorts of C’an Pastilla to El Arenal, this part of the seafront is known collectively as Playa de Palma. Look out for the ‘Balnearios’; which are a series of open air huts serving drinks and snacks.

Each year the Paseo Marítimo becomes alive due to the Palma International Boat Show; which takes place at Moll Vell, close to La Lonja and central Palma. After a year without a show because of the COVID-19 health crisis, preparations have started for the next edition of the show, which will take place between the 30th of April and the 3rd of May 2021.

Seafront Promenade

The seafront promenade in Palma actually starts from the military port near Port Pi and stretches all the way to Palma Airport. A 4 km section of this is the Paseo Maritimo. This article looks at the part of the promenade that is not on the Paseo Maritimo.

The promenade with its fantastic sea views is extremely popular for walkers, joggers, roller-skaters, skateboarders and cyclists. There are lots of bars, restaurants, cafes and shops to stop at when you need a break, there is also a mini-train that chugs along the promenade for those that are feeling less active.

Just beyond the cathedral at Ca’n Pere Antoni, is Palma City Beach. It is a golden, sandy beach that is very popular with the locals and visitors who are staying in Palma and fancy a quick dip in the sea.

With Palma Cathedral as a backdrop, Palma City Beach has incredible views, it also has a Blue Flag award for cleanliness.

Being located in Palma, the 750m long and 15m wide beach can get very busy during the summer season so the advice is to get there early to claim your piece of sand. If it is too busy, don’t worry, there is another beach just 1/2km further along at Portixol.

From Palma City Beach, the wide pedestrian promenade joins the popular resorts of C'an Pastilla to El Arenal, this part of the seafront is known collectively as Playa de Palma. Look out for the ‘Balnearios’; which are a series of open air huts serving drinks and snacks.

C'an Pastilla is a purpose-built tourist resort and is ideal for family holidays.

El Arenal is located on the eastern end of the 6 km long Playa de Palma about 15 km away from Palma and around 7km from the airport. It is a very popular resort particularly for the 18 to 30 crowd and is predominantly German.

Playa de Palma has a few attractions including Aqualand El Arenal, a waterpark with wave pools, artificial rivers and water slides a plenty and Palma Aquarium; which is one of the finest in Europe and has an excellent reputation for its marine research, conservation and preservation programs. The aquarium has a very impressive display of live coral and many of the corals that you will see have been breed within the premises.

Nightlife in Playa De Palma revolves around two main areas, the Mega Park near El Arenal and a party street named Carrer Padre Bartolome Salva (known as ‘Bar Street’) in the resort area of Les Meravelles.

Nightlife in Playa De Palma steps up at the end of summer when Mega Park hosts it’s classic Oktoberfest celebrations where visitors can get a taste of German food and drink while dancing away to all the classic Oktoberfest tunes. It is a fun celebration that tries hard to match Oktoberfest in Munich.

Palma City Beach

The closest beach to Palma is Palma City Beach located at Ca’n Pere Antoni; which starts just beyond the cathedral. It is a golden, sandy beach that is very popular with the locals and visitors who are staying in Palma and fancy a quick dip in the sea.

With Palma Cathedral as a backdrop, Palma City Beach has incredible views, it also has a Blue Flag award for cleanliness.

Being located in Palma, the 750m long and 15m wide beach can get very busy during the summer season so the advice is to get there early to claim your piece of sand. If it is too busy, don’t worry, there is another beach just 1/2km further along at Portixol.

You’ll find everything that you need there including toilets, showers, lifeguards, sunbeds and parasol hire plus a good selection of bars and restaurants including two beach clubs; which provide top-notch food and entertainment.

Being close to the Bay of Palma and the numerous ships and boats that travel these waterways, the water at the beach is not as clean as it is in some of the island’s more remote bays; however it is perfectly OK for swimming

A promenade called Avenida Gabriel Roca and a cycle path run along the length of the beach and there are two small car parks at either end of Ca’n Pere Antoni; which fill up quite quickly.

The vast, beautiful and historic Palma Cathedral (‘La Seu’ in Catalan) is without question, the major architectural landmark in the capital city. The awesome predominantly Gothic 14th century structure is located in the heart of the city and the sheer scale of the golden sandstone building makes it impossible to miss. Climbing high above the old city walls, the cathedral is the glory of Palma, a magnificent demonstration of the wealth and strength of the island’s Christian conquerors, from the sea, it is a superb sight.

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Tranvía de Sóller

The Tranvía de Sóller is one of the most well-known tourist attractions in Mallorca. It is a tram nicknamed ‘red lightning’; which connects the beautiful town of Sóller with the Port de Sóller district.

We’re not sure why the tram is referred to as ‘red lightning’, it is neither red nor very fast. The trams are orange in colour with wooden framed windows, open-sided wagons and wooden benches. The tramline opened in 1913 and some of the railcars and carriages used today date back to this period of time.

The journey from Sóller to the port takes around 15 minutes and passes through Plaza de la Constitución; which is the main square in Sóller and is a very popular meeting place for both locals and tourists. The tram passes cafes and bars with outside seating areas and you are so close to the tables, it is possible to see what people are eating and drinking.

From the square, Tranvía de Sóller passes by numerous orange groves and the old port facilities before reaching its destination.

The history of the Tranvía de Sóller is closely linked to that of the Tren de Sóller (the railway line that has connected Sóller with the island's capital Palma de Mallorca since 1912 with the tramline opening in 1913 as an extension of the route.

From the beginning, the rail cars were powered by electricity and initially, they served the dual function of transporting both people and goods. Freshly caught seafood was transported one way with coal and ammunition being transported in the other direction to resupply the former submarine and naval base at Port de Sóller.

The energy supply was provided by a separate power station located at the Sóller railway station.

Port de Sóller is a very pretty coastal village located in a large and protected horseshoe bay separated from the rest of Mallorca by the Tramuntana mountain range.

For further information about the tram, please visit the official website.

Port de Sóller

Port de Sóller is a very pretty coastal village located in a large and protected horseshoe bay separated from the rest of Mallorca by the Tramuntana mountain range.

Before the Sóller tunnel opened in the 1990s, Port de Sóller was a difficult place to get to with cars having to travel via the Coll de Sóller with tight hairpins every 200m or so. This road is now a popular cycling route with little traffic, especially since the tunnel has not been subject to a toll charge since 2018.

The isolated location of Port de Sóller at the foot of the mountains and the use of the area as a training base by the Spanish military resulted in the village coming through the over development of seaside destinations in Mallorca during the 70s and 80s relatively unscathed and it retains its traditional fishing port charm.

The village’s main role historically was to service the main town of Sóller located a few miles inland and to protect its residents from pirates. During the 19th century when the export of oranges and lemons grown in the area became very profitable, the port expanded significantly and just a decade or so ago, millions of euros were poured into sprucing up the port.

In 1561, Sóller’s beach was invaded by fleets of Turkish and Algerian pirates. The town’s residents managed to defeat the pirates using just using wooden swords and hand-held catapults. This epic defence is re-enacted each year in a festival called Es Firó.

The horseshoe bay has a sandy beach and a pedestrianised promenade with many cafes, restaurants and shops in addition to a few hotels, Many of the restaurants serve seafood; however there are more and more high-class eateries opening in the port due mainly to the opening of a 5-star luxury hotel on the hills above the village.

Sóller is an old Mediterranean town, designed around narrow streets with traditional style residential townhouses and is very popular with tourists & day trippers. The town is connected to Port de Sóller by a vintage tram, the Tranvía De Sóller; which takes passengers on a lovely journey through citrus and olive groves.

Even if you are only on the island for a short time, the narrow-gauge, Tren de Sóller journey from Palma to Sóller should be close to the top on your things-to-do list. One of the most rewarding excursions on the island, the vintage train to Sóller is a very popular attraction with a journey time of around 1 hour and 15 minutes.

Sometimes known as the Orange Express, the wooden train was originally introduced to transport oranges and lemons from the Sóller valley to the capital, replacing a stagecoach service, which crossed the high mountains via the Sóller pass on a steep, narrow dirt track, which was exhausting and tediously slow.

Funded by profits of the citrus fruit trade, the Tren de Sóller has trundled along the winding 27.3km route to Sóller since 1912.

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