Category: Palace

Category: Palace

Royal Palace Of La Almudaina

The Royal Palace of La Almudaina was a 10th century Muslim fortress (alcázar ) prior to being converted into a residence for the Mallorca Royal Family at the end of the 13th century.

A long time before the Moors arrived in the 10th century, the site had been utilised by both the Talaiots and the Romans and the area was once home to a Roman fort.

Symbolically, the King of Spain still resides here; however it is unlikely that you will see him there with the exception of an occasional important ceremony, the Royals prefer to spend summer in the Palau Marivent (in Cala Major) instead. In fact, since King Jaume III died in 1349, no king has lived in La Almudaina on a permanent basis.

Remodelled in the Levantine Gothic style by the Christians, The Royal Palace of La Almudaina is located opposite the magnificent Palma Cathedral, La Seu. Its elevated position has provided the palace with protection and strategic importance over the years and the building still serves as the Balearics military command.

Today, the palace is one of the capital’s main attractions and tourists can enjoy incredible, scenic views overlooking the Bay of Palma in addition to exploring the inside of the palace and its numerous rooms.

Whilst exploring the interior of the palace, you will find three grand rooms with bricked-in-Gothic arches that have been cut off in the middle, they were once double their height and would have formed a vast hall. These rooms have been luxuriously decorated and furnished with period pieces and tapestries.

Within the main courtyard, you will find the 11th century lion fountain and and the entrance to St Anne’s Chapel. This Chapel was built for the Queen at the beginning of the 14th century, as was St. James’s Chapel, which was for the use of the King.

The grand staircase takes you up to the royal apartments with beautiful timber ceilings and lavishly appointed rooms, which are worth seeing as many of the palace rooms are completely bare.

Beneath the palace are the S’Hort del Rei gardens which are a great place to sit, relax and watch the world go by. Look out for Joan Miro’s Egg sculpture and the Arc de la Drassana, once the gateway to the royal docks.

If you are staying in Palma, it’s a short walk or public bus ride to the Royal Palace. There is also plenty parking spaces in front of the Cathedral along the Paseo Marítimo.

The palace is open from 10am – 4pm Tuesday to Friday (closed on Monday) and 10am – 6pm on weekends and public holidays. Prices are €7 (basic), €4 (reduced) with an extra €4 for a guide or €3 for an audio guide.

Visitors can explore the grand rooms and apartments, and the chapel, at their leisure. See the opulent art, tapestries and furniture, then wander through the tranquil gardens.

BOOK TICKETS NOW

Free entrance: Wednesday all day and Sunday from 3pm to 6pm.

Further information can be found on the official website – patrimonionacional.es

Check out the Top Picks for accommodation near Royal Palace Of La Almudaina from Booking.com – Search now

Paseo Marítimo

The Paseo Marítimo is the wide sea promenade connecting the area of Porto Pi with the Parc de la Mar in front of the Cathedral. It is very popular with walkers, joggers and cyclists.

Also known as Avinguda Gabriel Roca, this 4 km stretch of promenade is the most popular walk in the city. There is so much to see along the way such as the wonderful harbour with row after row of yachts, Palma Cathedral, Bellver Castle and the stunning Mediterranean sea framed by pink sunrises or golden sunsets.

The recommended starting point for a walk along Paseo Maritimo is Porto Pi.  You’ll pass a number of attractions such as Tito’s; which is the hottest club in town (some would say, on the island) and Palma’s Auditorium; where you can watch shows and concerts and towards the end of your walk you’ll pass the 16th century wall around Es Baluard Museum. The final part of the 4km walk includes the Royal Palace of La Almudaina and the magnificent ‘La Seu’.

Forty plus years ago, the sea came right up to the walls of the Cathedral until the sea was pushed back in the 1970’s due to construction. City planners created an artificial lake called Parc de la Mar at the foot of La Seu; which today provides a great area for concerts and fairs plus a superb photograph opportunity.

Just beyond the cathedral at Ca’n Pere Antoni, is Palma City Beach. It is a golden, sandy beach that is very popular with the locals and visitors who are staying in Palma and fancy a quick dip in the sea.

From Palma City Beach, the wide pedestrian promenade joins the popular resorts of C’an Pastilla to El Arenal, this part of the seafront is known collectively as Playa de Palma. Look out for the ‘Balnearios’; which are a series of open air huts serving drinks and snacks.

Each year the Paseo Marítimo becomes alive due to the Palma International Boat Show; which takes place at Moll Vell, close to La Lonja and central Palma. After a year without a show because of the COVID-19 health crisis, preparations have started for the next edition of the show, which will take place between the 30th of April and the 3rd of May 2021.

Passeig Des Born

Passeig des Born, also known as Paseo del Borne is an iconic tree lined boulevard and one of the most elegant shopping areas in Palma hosting luxury designer brands such as Carolina Herrera, Louis Vuitton, Rolex, Hugo Boss & Mulberry.

Nicknamed ‘The Golden Mile’ but often just called ‘the Borne’, the street with wide promenade and pedestrianised section is busy with both people and traffic; however it is still a great place to sit down in one of the many cafes and restaurant terraces and watch the world go by.

The location and style of the Borne have made it the most sought after retail location on the island despite it having a lower footfall than other shopping areas.

Passeig des Born has a long history and has been host to countless fiestas and also many demonstrations. It is particularly pretty at Christmas when the trees are decorated with lights. A walk along the boulevard is very pleasant during the summertime when it is completed shaded by the trees. There are also plenty of public benches so you can sit down and take a break.

Bookending Passeig des Born are two small squares, one of these, Plaça de la Reina is located just a short walk away from the Royal Palace Of La Almudaina and Palma Cathedral. Plaça de la Reina has a round central fountain and a pretty flower garden and is a good place to stop for a photo.

If you are planning on visiting The Royal Palace or the Cathedral, then the route there along the Borne is recommended.

The vast, beautiful and historic Palma Cathedral (‘La Seu’ in Catalan) is without question, the major architectural landmark in the capital city. The awesome predominantly Gothic 14th century structure is located in the heart of the city and the sheer scale of the golden sandstone building makes it impossible to miss.

Top ways to experience Passeig des Born

Palma de Mallorca Bike Tour with Optional Tapas

Palma de Mallorca Cultural and Foodie Tour

Old Town Palma

There are a few must-see tourist attractions in Palma and many of these are located in Palma’s Old Town.

In Spanish the area is known as ‘El Casco Antiguo’ and it is home to the vast, beautiful and historic Palma Cathedral, the Royal Palace Of La Almudaina and the Es Baluard Contemporary Art Museum.

Palma Old Town is very picturesque and the best way to explore it as by foot. You’ll find medieval streets, Gothic architecture, a host of shops selling antique products and the elegant avenue Passeig des Born with its designer brand shops.

Over the years, many different cultures have left their mark on Palma and you can see this imprinted on and within the architecture of Palma Old Town.

The Royal Palace of La Almudaina was a 10th century Muslim fortress (alcázar ) prior to being converted into a residence for the Mallorca Royal Family at the end of the 13th century. Not so far away, another reminder of the Arabs time on the island are the Arab Baths.

The Cathedral ‘La Seu’ occupies the site of what once was the central mosque of Medina Mayurka, the capital of Muslim Mallorca for 300 years. The story behind the cathedral is long and full of interesting twists but began with the young King Jaume 1 who vowed to build a grand cathedral if he was successful in surviving a storm and also ridding the island of Moors.

Climbing high above the old city walls, the cathedral is the glory of Palma, a magnificent demonstration of the wealth and strength of the island’s Christian conquerors, from the sea, it is a superb sight.

This started a period of time when Moorish structures were either demolished or adapted and today many structures around the city show Gothic and Baroque influences.

Within the Old Town, you will also find 17th & 17th century homes, many now restored and adapted to become boutique-style hotels.

For further information about the Old Town, check out – Palma Old Town – Turismo de Interior