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Flight delay compensation

Did you know about Flight delay compensation?

Let’s admit it, at some time, you’ve probably missed a flight due to cancellation or you’ve had to wait at the airport for many hours due to delays. In addition to the major disruption this can cause to holiday and work schedules, it is also a stressful experience, particularly if you have children with you or tight deadlines to meet such as connecting flights or events.

Did you know that if you had a delayed or cancelled flight in the past 3 years, you could receive €600 per passenger, regardless of the ticket price? Additionally, you could be entitled to claim for luggage problems such as missing bags, delayed bags or damaged bags and also for out of pocket expenses such as hotels, meals & more.

Air passengers have rights. In the EU they are covered by EU REGULATION EC 261.

Even if your particular issue is not covered by law, it is often worthwhile claiming, you may still be entitled to a refund or vouchers for another flight.

Compensation is available for flight delays, flight cancellation, missed connections, overbooking, denied boarding, delayed baggage, and airline strikes.

The Mallorca Insider works with AirHelp, the world’s largest air passenger rights advocate. To date, they’ve helped over 16 million passengers understand their rights and secure compensation for delayed, cancelled, or overbooked flights.

They make claiming flight delay compensation straightforward for all passengers who are unsure of their rights, lack the time, or lack the expertise to embark on the claims process themselves. They’re continually investing in data and cutting-edge technology to power their easy-to-use website and make their customers’ claims even smoother.

They speak 16 languages, and their global staff of 750 includes the world’s largest team of lawyers specialised in air passenger rights. Combined with local knowledge from a network of law firms across 30 countries, they are uniquely placed to help air passengers all around the world.

Check now to see if you are entitled to compensation – Visit AirHelp

Port de Cala d’Or

Port de Cala d’Or is located in Cala Llonga due to space, access and winds. Cala Llonga provides sufficient room for nearly 600 moorings and with the exception of strong easterly winds, it is sheltered and well protected from the weather.

The beautiful marina is very well equipped and includes the Cala d’Or Yacht Club, most of which is open to non-members. On the quayside, you will find a good assortment of supermarkets, exclusive shops, boutiques, bars and restaurants.

Port de Cala d’Or has a 30,000 m2 offshore berthing esplanade and provides all of the services you would expect to find in a modern marina including mechanical assistance, technical service, cleaning & hull treatment.

Cala d’Or, often referred to as the ‘Golden Bay’ is a very popular holiday resort particularly suited to families located in the southeast of the island.

The name ‘Golden Bay’ derives from the fact that it is located furthest away from the Serra de Tramuntana mountains; which have a disruptive effect on weather patterns and therefore it benefits from increased sunshine hours. It also happens to be close to some of the best beaches in Mallorca.

The marina is one of the largest in Mallorca behind the more popular marinas of Puerto PortalsPalmaPort Adriano and Andratx.

The resort is attractive due to its multitude of small scenic coves and sandy beaches, these being Cala Ferrera, Cala Esmeralda, Cala Serena, Cala Gran, and Cala Llonga with each of these having their own distinctive character & main street where you will find the typical assortment of souvenir shops, pubs & restaurants.

Each of the coves benefit from charming little beaches framed by cliffs and woodland; however being small, they do get very crowded during the summer months.

Local attractions include The 18th-century historic fort ‘Es Fortí ’ and the ‘Parc Natural de Mondragó’ nature reserve.

Check out the Top Picks for accommodation near Port de Cala d’Or from Booking.com – Search now

Manacor to Alcudia

The Manacor to Alcudia route begins in Manacor, Mallorca's second-largest city, best known as the birthplace of tennis great Rafael Nadal and as a centre of furniture manufacturing.

There’s not a lot to see here; however the Esglesia dels Delors de Nostra Senyora church is worth a visit, so is the Manacor History Museum.

When you leave Manacor, follow the signs for Porto Cristo where you have the opportunity to visit the Caves of Drach, one of the largest caves in Europe and considered by many to be the 8th Wonder of the World. Within the caves is Lake Martel, one of the largest underground lakes on the planet; which today plays host to a boat-borne classical music program; which attracts visitors from far and wide.

From Porto Cristo follow the signs for Son Servera and Cala Millor, a lovely road; which meanders through orchards until you arrive at Cala Millor; which is a good place to stop for a short beach break.

The route then takes you east into Son Servera and then to Capdepera, largely undiscovered by the majority of visitors to the island. The biggest attraction in Capdepera is the ‘Castell de Capdepera’, it is a quite demanding walk uphill but the views are outstanding.

From Capdepera, take the road to Artà, a quiet, attractive rural town with a maze of narrow streets, medieval buildings and pretty cafes with an impressive hilltop fortress built in the 14th century.

From there, continue along the coastal road around the bay to Alcúdia, a beautiful medieval walled town of quiet charm and character.

Surrounded by mighty walls that contain historic mansions, scenic plazas, cafés with beautiful terraces & warm-stone houses, this vibrant town is a year-round destination, providing a rich taste of history and culture.

The Manacor to Alcudia drive is an excellent way to spend a day taking you through some great locations and with some incredible views.

Sa Calobra Serpentine

Just 13km long, the Sa Calobra Serpentine (MA-2141) is one of the most scenic drives in the world.

It is referred to as ‘The Snake’ by locals but ‘Spaghetti’ would be more apt and was built specifically to avoid tunnels resulting in a road that snakes through the landscape often with a gradient in excess of 7%; which is why it is very popular with cyclists and is mentioned in our ‘best cycling routes’ section.

With a 800m descent over 12km and the infamous 270 degree loop known as the ‘Knotted Tie’ and incredible mountain views of Mallorca’s highest mountain, Puig Major, the road to Sa Calobra is an adventure in its own right.

The Sa Calobra Serpentine was manually built in 1932 and was created by the engineer Antonio Paretti and is a masterpiece of twists and turns; however it is one of the most dangerous roads in Spain with no marked central line and no guardrails and much too much traffic especially during the summer.

At times, the road is very narrow and impassable for 2 cars at the same time and on rainy days, the asphalt becomes extremely slippy. It should not be attempted by those who don't know how to reverse. 

The 25 minute route is an unforgettable and sensational experience but definitely not for anyone who is nervous of steep, winding descents. It has more than 50 curves with the majority of those being hairpins and the gradient can reach as high as 11.5%.

Sa Calobra is a small village on the coast that is widely regarded as having the best unspoilt cove on the island. It also has a hidden beach and an incredible gorge – Es Torrent de Pareis. Tourists flock to this location in their hundreds all year around to admire the jaw-dropping scenery and to enjoy the incredible journey there with its twisting roads and spectacular views.

Cala Llombards

Cala Llombards is a beautiful petite cove defined by rough rock walls and framed with pine trees. With its sandy beach, turquoise waters and red cliffs it truly is a picture-postcard setting.

The secluded cove beach is located in the southeast of the island close to the small village of Es Llombards and around 10km from the handsome inland town of Santyani.

Just 55m long but nearly 150m deep, Cala Llombards is not a big beach but it is truly beautiful. It is surrounded by steep cliffs and has rocky areas, pine trees and bushes plus soft white sand and really crystal clear water; which is ideal for snorkelling.

With the exception of those who live or rent in the surrounding area, the beach is not well-known and therefore it escapes the tourist crowds.

It is a safe beach for kids because there are very few waves and is popular with locals and tourists of all ages. There is a lifeguard present during the summer months.

Facilities include lounge chairs and parasols plus showers and toilets; however there are no water activities for hire.

You’ll find just one beach bar at Cala Llombards; which serves drinks and snacks.

When you’ve packed up from the beach, we recommend a trip to the local town of Santyani, its a handsome town in south east Mallorca. Both serene and historic, it is located between Parc Natural de Mondragó and Ses Salines and the honey-coloured architecture, fine choice of bars, boutique shops, art galleries & restaurants are a massive draw to tourists.

Particularly favoured by German tourists, this pretty, rural, authentically Mallorcan town is blessed with beautiful natural surroundings.

With a slow pace of life, quaint cobbled streets and majestic church, Santyani has a special quality. Sit down on one of the many terraces on the main square (Plaça Major) in front of the church and watch the world go by.

Check out the Top Picks for accommodation near Cala Llombards from Booking.com – Search now

Sa Calobra Beach

Sa Calobra beach is a well-known remote cove on the west coast of Mallorca situated a short walk away from the incredible rocky river gorge, Es Torrent de Pareis.

It is a small and undeniably attractive white-pebble cove with blue-green crystal clear water and is one of the most famous spots on the island.

There are two beaches in the cove, the first one is small and stony and is not the beach that everyone comes to see, that can be found by taking the paved path on the right-hand-side; which takes you through a short and narrow tunnel.

If you are planning to stay at the beach for a while, you’ll need to bring along some things to make you comfortable as there are no facilities there including a lifeguard. You will find bars and restaurants back at Sa Calobra where you will also find public toilets and first aid.

The spot is indeed lovely and has served as an inspiration to artists past and present; however it has become a victim of it’s own beauty. There are just too many tourists there and it's a coach & car-fest during the summer crush.

The beach has a history dating back to the 18th century and it is even rumoured that the infamous pirate Red Beard docked in Sa Calobra.

Tourists flock to this location in their hundreds all year around to admire the jaw-dropping scenery and to enjoy the incredible journey there with its twisting roads and spectacular views.

With a 800m descent over 12km and the infamous 270 degree loop known as the ‘Knotted Tie’ and incredible mountain views of Mallorca’s highest mountain, Puig Major, the road to Sa Calobra is an adventure in its own right.

Es Torrent de Pareis was elevated to the category of Natural Monument in 2003 by the Government of the Balearic Islands.

Cala Marçal

The Blue Flag spacious beach Cala Marcal is located on the eastern coast of the island 1km south of the marina and village of Portocolom.

The 500 m beach lies within a beautiful well-protected bay with rocks on both sides, fine white sand and clear waters. It is very popular, particularly during the summer months when it can get quite crowded.

Cala Marcal is ideal for families. The soft sand slopes into the sea; which is shallow and deepens gradually providing lots of space for the kids to swim and play.

On the beach, you will find all of the facilities you could need such as sun lounges, parasols, showers and toilets and during the summer peak season, the beach is also supervised by a lifeguard. There is also one large beach bar serving a good assortment of drinks and snacks.

Cala Marcal is popular with snorkelers because of the rocks but mostly, this is a beach for families, it is very safe and around the beach you will find everything you could need including shops, bars & restaurants.

Taking the car to Cala Marcal is easy, parking is available in the streets just south of the beach.

The local village of Portocolom is a sleepy, attractive traditional fishing village located on the east coast and is claimed rather dubiously as the birthplace of Christopher Columbus, although there is little evidence to support this.

Resisting the usual tourist onslaught associated with picturesque coastal villages, Portocolom is a maritime town located on a beautiful deep natural harbour in a large horseshoe-shaped bay.

Lying 12km north of Cala d’Or and within the district of Felanitx, Portocolom has retained much of its traditional fishing village charm with fishing boats, sailing boats and the occasional luxury motor yacht anchored in the calm waters of the bay.

Check out the Top Picks for accommodation near Cala Marcal from Booking.com – Search now

Portals Nous (Oratori) Beach

Oratori is simply a great beach and the Editor’s favourite. You couldn’t wish for a better location, right next to glamorous Puerto Portals with its numerous bars, cafés & restaurants & home of probably the best beach bar on the island, Roxy’s Beach Bar.

Oratori is a Blue Flag beach located between Puerto Portals and the small community of Bendinat in the southwest of the island. The beach is very popular with the younger crowd due to its proximity to Portals and the associated foodie and nightlife scene. The beach is also popular with families because of the superb nearby amenities and facilities.

You’ve got 250m of golden sand, clear blue seas and even an island to swim to should you find the energy to do so. Facilities include sun loungers and parasols, showers and toilets and lifeguards.

There’s also water sports available; which includes paddle boats and kayaks that you can rent.

You’ll find an eclectic mix of nationalities at Oratori. The beach is particularly attractive to British and German expats and locals – which is a good indicator of how fantastic the beach is. It is also popular with yachties who moor their yachts at the marina and come ashore to sunbathe and eat in the many restaurants.

For foodies, Puerto Portals offers an excellent choice with varied menus and venues. You can enjoy breakfast, lunch or dinner on sunny terraces watching the expensive cars drive by or choose a Mediterranean lounge setting or a salon.

The easiest way to drive to the beach is via the MA-1 that runs from Palma all the way through to Andratx. Take the Costa d’en Blanes-Portals Nous exit and then follow signs to Portals Nous.

Finding a parking space can be hit or miss and you’re probably end up having to take a bit of a walk from your car to the beach. Public transport may be your best option.

Check out the Top Picks for accommodation near Portals Nous (Oratori) Beach from Booking.com – Search now

Cala Deià

Cala Deià is a small, picturesque shingle beach framed by the stunning Tramuntana mountains and located on the northwest coast of Mallorca. The rocky, rugged beach has very clear 6m deep waters and is only around 70m long.

The tiny cove beach is mostly made up of large rocks and small pebbles with glistening rock pools and great views. It has two restaurants; which both provide local cuisine such as tapas, paella and an assortment of fish.

Located just outside the beautiful village of Deià, the beach is very popular with locals and visitors and is a favourite destination for artists. It is not unusual to see the occasional celebrity on the beach.

Cala Deià is an ideal location for swimming, snorkelling and diving due to the crystal clear waters; however there are no equipment rental facilities on the beach so you will need to bring your own.

The beach is not considered to be family-friendly due to the rocky beach and lack of sand, it also has multiple jellyfish sightings during the summer months. The beach also has no umbrellas, lounge chairs, water sports activities or lifeguard and access to first aid is minimal. The beach does have toilets and showers.

Many visitors enjoy walking along the cliffs up to the former pirate tower with its terrific views.

You can get to the beach by car and if you arrive early enough, there is a small car park or you could park in the village and walk, it is around 3 km.

Deià is a small mountain-coastal village that has attracted artists, tourists and celebrities for many years. One of the prettiest villages in Mallorca, Deià is part of a landscape awarded World Heritage Site status. The writer Robert Graves famously lived in the village twice with many of his creative, artistic friends coming to visit and Deià quickly gained a reputation as an artist’s retreat.

Check out the Top Picks for accommodation near Cala Deià from Booking.com – Search now

Palma Arab Baths

Palma Arab Baths (Banys Arabs) is a 10th century ancient bathhouse and some of the last remnants of the Arab City known as Medina Mayurqa, the capital of Muslim Mallorca for 300 years.

The Arab bathhouse or ‘hammams’ is located in the gardens of a former nobleman's manor on the quiet street of Can Serra within the narrow streets of the medieval quarter of Palma and amazingly, the building is still intact.

Palma Arab Baths are similar to those found in other Islamic cities. The steam room has a preserved tepidarium with a cupola (dome) in the shape of a half orange; which is supported by 12 columns believed to have been recycled from a number of Roman buildings as each column is different.

The cupola has various round apertures to allow steam to escape the room and there is a double floor through which the hot water and steam travelled, proof that this room was used for hot baths. The cupola also has five oculi which let in light.

The bathhouse has a walled garden with cactus, palm and orange trees and is where the residents of the manor would have cooled off after their bath. Many locals come here to enjoy a refreshment during the day.

Palma’s Arab Baths are located on Carrer de Can Serra, just behind the Museum of Mallorca. It’s easy to reach the Baths on foot from downtown; they are about five minutes’ walk from Palma Cathedral.

The Cathedral occupies the site of what once was the central mosque of Medina Mayurka.

Arab Baths

The story behind the cathedral is long and full of interesting twists but began with the young King Jaume 1 who vowed to build a grand cathedral if he was successful in surviving a storm and also ridding the island of Moors.

The Arab Baths are open Monday to Friday from 10 am to 6 pm and the entrance fee is €2.50.